Autobiography / Memoir

The Unique Courage of One Mother

October 24, 2012
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Indie author Susan  Torres

The New York Times once called Susan Torres “Single Mother, Creator of Miracles.”

Susan’s story begins in Brooklyn, where she was raised in the ’60s in a drug infested, abusive home. She left home as a teenager, and soon was a mother herself.

Living on Three SpoonsLiving on Three Spoons
Read the First 10 Pages of this book

Against the odds, Susan extricated her young family from another drug-shadowed environment and a subsequent abusive relationship by dint of raw courage and determination.

Her new memoir “Living on Three Spoons” chronicles the lessons she learned and applied to inspire her life and help her own four children to “fight back” against oppressive forces in life.

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Listen to Susan Torres

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The Indie Author Life

Susan Torres as featured in the New York Times

Susan Torres & family as featured in the New York Times


The New York Times article that inspired Susan Torres to write this autobiography is, indeed, called “Single Mother, Creator of Miracles,” and describes her in glowing terms:

She is relentlessly bubbly, constantly chatting up strangers. She once fixed up her second daughter, Jessica, 23, with a plumber, thinking that besides being cute, he might repair the air-conditioning. Sadly, it did not last. “Too bad,” Ms. Torres says. “He said he’d give us a good price.” Instead, she bought a window air-conditioner for Nissim’s room, and on hot nights, the whole family sleeps in there.

As you’ll hear in our interview I asked Susan where she came up with the title of her book. She emailed me afterward to expand on the answer she gave:

There were five of us and we each to wait for a spoon to eat our cereal each morning. Time was of the essence; I had to get the kids to school and then rush to work. So waiting was a time waster. When I had the extra money to buy spoons, I had no time. And when I had the time, I didn’t have the money. This went on for a long time (maybe years). One day I said aloud, “I can’t believe we’re living on three spoons!” But, I said inside, if this is the worst of it, I’ll take it!

Read more about Susan and her family — and see pics! — at www.livingonthreespoons.com.

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