YA / Coming of Age

Will It Take a Miracle To Restore This Friendship?

June 7, 2013
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Hating Heidi FosterHating Heidi Foster
Read the First 10 Pages of this book

Mae McBride and Heidi Foster were the very best of friends. Tied at the hip from early elementary school, their relationship was the stuff of storybooks, legendary even, in the minds of their high school classmates.

Unshakable.

That is, until Mae’s father died while saving Heidi’s life.

In Jeffrey Blount‘s novel “Hating Heidi Foster” Mae blames Heidi. She blames her father for putting Heidi ahead of her. She blames her friends for taking Heidi’s side. She begins to unravel amid that blame and her uncontrollable and atypical anger.

At the same time Heidi is beset by guilt, falls into depression and stops eating properly; wasting away physically and emotionally while waiting for Mae to let her back into the friendship she misses so dearly.

Indie author Jeffrey Blount

What could possibly bring these two old friends back to each other? A miracle?

“Hating Heidi Foster” is a young adult novel about the place of honor true friendships hold in our lives. It is about suffering and loss and the ethics of grief. It is about a deep and painful conflict, the bright light of selflessness and sacrifice and the love that rights the ship and carries us safely to port.

More below the media player.

Listen to Jeffrey Blount

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The Indie Author Life

As you heard in our interview, Jeffrey Blount was inspired to write “Hating Heidi Foster” while observing his own daughter and her close friends. Blount tells about it, on his website:

My daughter, Julia, had a large group of high school friends and they often ended up at our home on weekend nights, watching movies, playing games or cooking huge amounts of spaghetti. One night, I waded into the chaos and caught sight of her and her long-time friend, Emily, talking and laughing, sharing an intimate moment. It took my breath away. In an instant, I remembered the two of them as second graders just getting to know each other. I fast-forwarded through the dinners at each other’s home, the sleep-overs, watching them walk in together and stand by each other at every school assembly, laughing with teachers as they relayed their Julia and Emily stories, smiling as I recalled the hysterical home videos that they made and just being floored by the beautiful young women they had become as they took pictures with their dates before their first prom. They had always been there for each other, helping each other grow up to find a solid footing in life.

In just a few months, they would be graduating, leaving their school, their homes and each other. Thirty years removed from high school, I was in touch with only one friend. I envisioned the girls many years later physically and emotionally far removed from each other, those years of companionship a very distant memory. That possibility made me sad. I wondered what I could give them that would remind them of their friendship and its importance in their early lives.

Read much more here.

And see the trailer for “Hating Heidi Foster”:

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